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Hazing News

Please define “inappropriate” if there ever is a next time, Principals and School Boards. Criminal? Non-criminal?

Here is the story link

Once again, getting information out of an administrator is difficult, but it can be done. Classic example of a paper that let an andministrator and thus a school and team off the hook. Maybe there was nothing criminal that occurred. But the public cannot tell from this information.

CHEYENNE, Wyo. — Some members of Cheyenne Central wrestling team have been punished for inappropriate behavior during a recent team activity.

Central Principal Matt Strannigan described the behavior as fitting the general definition of hazing.

Strannigan declined to say how many athletes have been disciplined or how long their suspensions will last, citing privacy concerns.

He tells the Wyoming Tribune Eagle that the matter was brought to the school’s attention by parents.

Administrators should not be allowed freedom to gloss over the actual incidents by hiding under FERPA. Keep the names redacted unless the alleged perpetrator is 18 or older. But specify the events. And parents in this case–if the matter was potentially criminal beavior, tell a police officer or sheriff first–nota principal or a coach–not given how he and they have failed to respond regarding the wrestling incident. However, the subsequent calls after police are informed should be to multiple school authorities, including a school nurse if an injury has occurred.

By Hank Nuwer

Hank Nuwer is the Indiana-based author of Broken Pledges: The Deadly Rite of Hazing, High School Hazing, Wrongs of Passage and The Hazing Reader. He has written articles or columns on hazing for the Sunday Times of India, Toronto Globe & Mail, Harper's Magazine, Orlando Sentinel, The Chronicle of Higher Education and the New York Times Sunday Magazine. His new book is Hazing: Destroying Young Lives from Indiana University Press.

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